1973 BMW 3.0CS 4-Speed – Atlanta

With sleek lines and an airy open greenhouse, the E9 is truly one of the best looking BMWs built to-date.

With sleek lines and an airy open greenhouse, the E9 is truly one of the best looking BMWs built to-date. The buttery-smooth inline-six only further complements the car. To put it simply, the E9 is the epitome of cool. BMW was on a roll in the 1960s, introducing bigger, more sophisticated models. Its recovery began with the 700, followed by the sporty Neue Klasse saloons. For the NK coupés, the 2000 C/CS of 1965, design chief Wilhelm Hofmeister and Manfred Rennen took their cues from the Giugiaro-penned 3200 CS. The shape was deftly facelifted on a longer wheelbase to become the E9, launched as the 2800 CS in ’68. Produced between 1968 and 1975, the BMW E9 was based on and the successor to the BMW 2000 C and 2000 CS.  The new E9 carried over design elements from the 2000 C and 2000 CS, specifically the area of the body from the front doors on back to the rear bumper.

Produced between 1968 and 1975, the BMW E9 was based on and the successor to the BMW 2000 C and 2000 CS. The new E9 carried over design elements from the 2000 C and 2000 CS, specifically the area of the body from the front doors on back to the rear bumper.

The design of the E9 was substantially different from the vehicle it replaced on the front end. The front end was extended and redesigned to accommodate the new M30 engine. The M30 engine, a six-cylinder overhead cam engine replaced the four-cylinder M10.

In addition to a new engine, the new BMW E9 switched from rear drum brakes to disk brakes to accommodate the higher performance of the M30. The new E9 was also lighter than the outgoing 2000 C and 2000 CS.